It is now 15 years since the seminal work on Place Attachment appeared (Altman and Low, 1992), referring to the typically positive emotional bond between people and valued locations or places. In the intervening period of time, many studies have been conducted on the subject of place attachment in both urban and rural contexts, focusing upon places at different spatial scales (e.g. home, neighbourhood, city, rural area). Research has also taken place on the associated concept of Place Identity (Proshansky et al., 1983), which typically refers to the ways in which particular locations can become important for individuals and groups to create and maintain a positive sense of self or identity. Yet the inter-relation between these concepts is not always clear in the literature, as different studies adopt different conceptual approaches, operationalisation of concepts and methods. Recent work by Stedman (2002), drawing explicitly upon social psychology theory, has begun to make clearer how place attachment and place identity are important influences upon people’s intentions to act. For example, in his research he showed that individuals who were strongly attached to a rural American place and who conceived it to be essentially ‘pristine’ or ‘natural’ were more likely to intend to take ‘place protective’ actions to prevent further housing development in that locality. However, we feel that this aspect of place research needs further examination and analysis, and our symposium aims to deepen understanding of this subject, particularly how the concepts of place attachment and place identity may be implicated in shaping intentions to undertake a range of environmentally significant behaviour (Stern, 2000), including pro-environmental or ecological behaviours, and research in this area is a particular focus of this symposium. The concept of ‘place’ is a conceptual cornerstone not just of the discipline of environmental psychology (Canter, 1977; Bonnes and Secchiaroli, 1995) but also of the field of environment behaviour studies (Sommer, 2000). Whilst there is consensus as to its importance, there is no unifying paradigm to study place in the environment-behaviour field. Rather a plurality of approaches exist (Patterson and Williams, 2005), which is manifest both by the range of place-related terms used in the literature (e.g. sense of place, rootedness, topophilia, placelessness, place attachment, place dependence, displacement, place identity) and by the variety of definitions and interpretations of terms such as place attachment or place identity employed in different studies. In this proposed symposium, we intend to contribute to place theory by bringing together a range of international speakers to focus upon two key concepts: place attachment and place identity, with a particular interest in how these two concepts might link together and how they might link to action, both individual and collective. By doing so, we hope to strengthen the potential for collaboration between environmental psychologists working on place across different European countries. It is now 15 years since the seminal work on Place Attachment appeared (Altman and Low, 1992), referring to the typically positive emotional bond between people and valued locations or places. In the intervening period of time, many studies have been conducted on the subject of place attachment in both urban and rural contexts, focusing upon places at different spatial scales (e.g. home, neighbourhood, city, rural area). Research has also taken place on the associated concept of Place Identity (Proshansky et al., 1983), which typically refers to the ways in which particular locations can become important for individuals and groups to create and maintain a positive sense of self or identity. Yet the inter-relation between these concepts is not always clear in the literature, as different studies adopt different conceptual approaches, operationalisation of concepts and methods. Recent work by Stedman (2002), drawing explicitly upon social psychology theory, has begun to make clearer how place attachment and place identity are important influences upon people’s intentions to act. For example, in his research he showed that individuals who were strongly attached to a rural American place and who conceived it to be essentially ‘pristine’ or ‘natural’ were more likely to intend to take ‘place protective’ actions to prevent further housing development in that locality. However, we feel that this aspect of place research needs further examination and analysis, and our symposium aims to deepen understanding of this subject, particularly how the concepts of place attachment and place identity may be implicated in shaping intentions to undertake a range of environmentally significant behaviour (Stern, 2000), including pro-environmental or ecological behaviours, and research in this area is a particular focus of this symposium. Proposed Symposium Details: Proposer: Dr. Patrick Devine-Wright, University of Manchester Discussant: Maria Vittoria Giuliani (Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Italian National Research Council) Speakers: Paola Passafaro (University of Rome, Italy) Ferdinando Fornara (University of Cagliari, Sicily)) Patrick Devine- Wright (University of Manchester, UK) Bernardo Hernández (Universidad de La Laguna, Spain)